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20131101
20131130
STATION
CSPAN3 10
LANGUAGE
English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2013 9:00am EST
.a. from yale law school. steve chabinsky is senior vice president of legal affairs general counsel and chief risk officer of the international technology firm crowd strike. he's also an adjunct faculty member at george washington university and the cyber columnist for "security" magazine. prior to joining crowd strike, steve was at the fbi for 17 years, culminating in his service as deputy assistant director in the fbi's cyber division. prior to that, he organized and led the fbi's cyber intelligence program. he's also served in the office of director of national intelligence. he's a graduate of duke university and duke law school. laura donohue is a professor of law at georgetown law and director of georgetown center on national security and the law. she writes on national security and counterterrorism law in the united states and the united kingdom, including on emerging technologies. professor donohue has held fellowships at stanford law school center for constitutional law, stanford university center for international security and cooperation and harvard university's john f. ke
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 7:29pm EST
-- >> not your job. this is an orphan. mr. vanroekel, you came out of the private sector. bill gates and steve balmer and a lot of other people at microsoft would have had somebody's net hung, maybe not literally, and maybe not fired them, but they would would want to know, demand to know, steve jobs when he was alive over at apple, or in the other programs, they would have said, who the blank is responsible for this failure? can you tell me today whose job it was to make sure that we didn't have this dreadful failure to launch, that didn't call the one person that should have known and didn't do their job? one person. who was that person? >> as i said earlier, i wasn't close to the actual development. i'm not in a position to make that call. >> i had you, mr. park, mr. baitman and mr. chao, none of you today can tell us who failed to do their job. and as a result, the american people lost a month of any effective, real ability to sign up. this website was dead at launch for all practical purposes. and i'm sorry, mr. chao, but you can give me all the numbers you want, six on the first day, 240
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 3:29pm EST
services. mr. todd park is the chief technology aufrgs ot united states. mr. steve van rokel is the chief information officer of the united states. okay. and pursuant to the rules, as many of you have not been here before to see, i'd ask that you all rise to take a sworn oath. please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear or affirm that the testimony you're about to give will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. let the record -- please be seated. >>> let the record reflect that all witnesses answered in the affirmative. this is a large panel and it's sfoing to be a long day. i suspect witnesses will be asked questions by both sides of the aisle. i would ask that you adhere to the time clock and come to a halt as quickly as possible when it hits red. please, understand, yellow is not an opportunity to start a new subject. it is an opportunity to wrap up. and with that, we'll go to our distinguished guests. >> we appreciate the opportunity to help uncover complex it ak wi zigtss. and now, we are faced with more visible projects. these complex projects can be deli
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2013 11:00am EST
a little more specific on what the private sector should be able to do, and maybe steve you or anyone else jump in on this. there's been a lot of discussion of active defense, of actions that the private sector could do in its own infrastructure, honey pots, et cetera or moving outside of its infrastructure to try to get back its data. is this part of what you're talking about as greater private sector role in deterrence, and i guess from others, are there reactions to that specifically? >> first i would like to say there is the playbook for cyber events. some of these issues are discussed there and in a way that is very even-handed to address the issues. >> steve saved us by holding it up. >> i have no financial interest in this. i actually can say that. a very good compendium. i would rather start on the highest end of that question where the private sector should be and touch on the comments i made earlier, which again would require a sort of paradigm shift. a paradigm shift in which we try to realize that the internet and technologies from a security perspective have differential that
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 6:00pm EST
people, but they were polite. and steve carson made me squirm for my dinner by asking hard questions. but he too was a good -- he was very dubious about what i was saying. i'm pleased to report that our friend, the late steve, told me not too long before he died, really, that he remembered that session. and he was gracious enough to say that his doubts had been relieved. and he agreed with me -- what i was arguing about. and, of course, it was as greg says, only a few years ago that we were honored -- my partner and i were honored for our editorial work by this group. and it was -- it's something we are very proud of, and i can't thank you enough for that honor. you may not think that i've done you any favor of talking about the gettysburg address. everybody knows the gettysburg address. most of you can recite it, i'm sure. it's the most famous speech in the world. a lot of people think it's the best speech in the world. it's storied. there are endless, endless mythology about it. and i know that the myths irritate some serious historians. but i think it's all part of the landscape.
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 5:49pm EST
. and steve carson made me squirm for my dinner by asking hard questions. but he too was a good -- he was very dubious about what i was saying. i'm pleased to report that our friend, the late steve, told me not too long before he died, really, that he remembered that session. and he was gracious enough to say that his doubts had been relieved. and he agreed with me -- what i was arguing about. and, of course, it was as greg says, only a few years ago that we were honored -- my partner and i were honored for our editorial work by this group. and it was -- it's something we are very proud of, and i can't thank you enough for that honor. you may not think that i've done you any favor of talking about the gettysburg address. everybody knows the gettysburg address. most of you can recite it, i'm sure. it's the most famous speech in the world. a lot of people think it's the best speech in the world. it's storied. there are endless, endless mythology about it. and i know that the myths irritate some serious historians. but i think it's all part of the landscape. if you're going to have something grea
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 10:29pm EST
as well. >> thank you, mr. ambassador. steve shapiro, a councilmember. if you could just expound a bit on the difficulties demonstrated in the afghanistan operation by conflicting rules of engagement and caveated forces. i think that's a complex issue i don't get to hear enough about. >> just on that, i mean, every operation has -- every country that operates within a coalition perspective will have its own specific issues of concern. we have caveats, the united states. the issue is whether those caveats affect the operational effect of the force. at least since i was involved in this operation since 2009, the answer is no, that most of the caveats that really did have an operational impact were removed, were dropped in one way or another, and the effectiveness of the force as a totality to do what it needed to do was not affected by these caveats. but let's be clear. caveats is a reality of coalition warfare. and it's a reality that affects us as much as anybody else. and it is -- it is -- it's a myth that somehow there's some countries that have caveats and others don't. that's not q
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 9:00am EST
at headquarters and i'm asked by bear bryant and steve dillard to put in for a desk at wfo and this desk, this squad is to look at some multiple allegations of penetration of the intelligence community that are not attributable to ames. the squad that was conducting the ames case was also starting firing up on the pitts case out of new york. so -- >> another fbi spy. >> they co-located my squad with that squad. and we helped each other. mike donner became the supervisor of that group. i stole some of the best talent from the washington field office in order to staff my squad, about 14, 15 people. i'd come and talk to them on their -- in their squad and i'd just say hello and i haven't seen you in a while and are you happy here? and couldn't tell their supervisor. so i took dillard up on the challenge. he said, hey, i want this guy, that woman, and that person and after i talked to them for four or five minutes they get this funny call from galley row to take a polygraph. they started figuring it out, because after i show up they get this call and then after they pass the polygraph, they
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)